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Posts Tagged ‘jobs’

A potential Ikea interview?

An important part of the service at Euro London is preparing our candidates for the interview process – a prospect that strikes fear into many and leaves others running for the door! By talking candidates through possible interview questions, as well as giving them tips on how to make a positive impression, we aim to make our candidates feel confident to tackle the real thing.

After all, interviews should be viewed as the perfect opportunity to show off your personality and make a positive impact. 

Follow these simple tips and you may be one step closer to bagging your dream job…

Appearance – You’ve heard it all before, but it’s true! First impressions count. So, make sure to dress professionally. If you are unsure about the company’s dress code, always verge on the side of caution. After all, it is better to be too smart rather than too casual.

Timing – Set that alarm and find that watch, because being on time is essential. It may sound simple but lateness is the quickest way into the interviewer’s bad books. Plan your journey and familiarise yourself with the location to ensure that you arrive promptly. If a situation arises in which being late is inevitable, remember to keep the interviewer informed.

Research – Just like the well known Scout motto, always be prepared. Take time before the interview to research the company as much as possible. Information can range from the business’s main competitors to their core company values. The more clued up you are the better. Doing your homework will also highlight your enthusiasm and interest in the company, which can only be a good thing.

Mobile – Turn off your phone. It may seem simple but here at Euro London we’ve come across our fair share of interviews interrupted by bleeping mobiles.    

Listen – Take time to consider your answers. Pacing yourself demonstrates thought and control, qualities the interviewer will value over rushed and confused answers. Keep information relevant and ask if you do not understand the question – this is particularly applicable if not being interviewed in your mother tongue.

Questions – Always ask questions. An interview is a two way process; not only is it an opportunity for the interviewer to find out about you but also for you to gain information about them and the available role. Being inquisitive demonstrates a thirst for knowledge as well as an interest in the role.

Finally, remember to stay positive and do your best!

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London calling

There are a lot of reasons to visit the UK approaching – the Royal wedding and the Olympics to name a couple. But what about getting a job?

We have a lot of international candidates applying for jobs in the UK, but we have found that in order to beat off the competition for jobs, moving to the UK first is highly beneficial.

For graduate or junior to mid level positions, employers are receiving a high number of applications. How do they choose a shortlist? They look at experience and skills but also location. A candidate applying from Spain could have great skills but if the employer has a CV of someone with the same skills that is applying from the local area, they are more likely to get an interview. The truth is that businesses want someone to start as soon as possible and if a candidate has to arrange travel for an interview and then has to relocate for the job, the employer may not be willing to wait that long.

Our advice? Come join us in the UK and then start applying! Living here will mean you’ll be able to attend interviews at short-notice, putting you ahead of the competition living overseas. Getting a part-time job in the UK and living with English speaking people will also enable you to improve your English skills if it’s not your native language, again making you a more attractive potential employee. If you need some advice on where to start, check out the relocation guide on our website. Good luck!

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Here is the next post in our ‘so you want to be a…’ series. Hope you find it useful!

What does the role entail?

This role that we recruited for recently was a Wholesale Licenser/Pharmacist, which required someone to work for a Japanese pharmaceutical company and trade medicines from suppliers in Europe to the UK wholesale market.

What languages are needed?

As this role was for a Japanese company, it required a Japanese speaker who understood how business operates in Japan and could communicate effectively with people at the company’s headquarters. However the person needed to liaise with suppliers in EU counties and so any European languages were also beneficial. (more…)

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You may have seen our recent post explaining that we are going to be profiling a range of the different jobs you can do with languages here on our blog. Our first one was on life as a football researcher followed by life as a video games tester. Here is the third one – carry on reading to find out about life as a poker customer services representative. (Remember: these aren’t roles we’re actively recruiting for – just a selection of jobs we have recruited for in the past to give you an idea of the wide range of jobs you can do with a language!)

What does the role entail?

Being a poker customer services representative will see you providing customer support via email to customers; this may be assisting them with depositing funds into their account, navigating them around the site or explaining how to play in tournaments. You will also be involved in updating and translating web content and watching live poker games online to ensure there is no cheating. (more…)

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We hope you found our first blog post on life as a football researcher interesting and that it sheds some light on the kind of exciting opportunities that languages can offer. Here is the second one – carry on reading to find out about life as a video games tester.

What does the role entail?

Being a video games tester involves testing computer games to see if there are any issues, and if so reporting any bugs so that they can be fixed prior to being released. You will also be involved in translating the content and scripts into different languages.  You will spend a large part of your time playing the video games so an interest in gaming is a must!

What languages are needed for it?

A range – we have previously recruited for roles requiring German, Dutch, French, Turkish, Italian, Norwegian and Danish.

What’s the typical pay?

Depending on your experience you can expect to be paid between £14,000 and £26,000 a year.

What skills and qualifications will you need?

A passion for gaming is a must as you will be spending a large amount of time testing out games. You will also need to be fluent in a specific language, e.g French if you are going to be translating scripts that are in French.  A translation qualification or a degree is an added advantage but not a must for this role.

Why is it a great job?

For those of you that love to play video games, what better opportunity is there to work doing something you love – playing video games for a job surely can’t be bad?

How can I apply?

If you are interested in working as a video games tester look for QA or localisation roles on the online job boards. Alternatively, keep an eye out on our website for the latest vacancies we have on offer or contact w.tritton@eurolondon.com .  Good luck!

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So you want to be a football researcher?

You may have seen our last blog post explaining that we’re going to be profiling a range of the different jobs you can do with languages here on the blog. So here is the first one – read on to find out about life as a football researcher…

What does the role entail?

Being a football researcher involves using the internet and other sources to research and analyse all aspects of football, clubs and players. This information will then be passed on and used to make betting decisions. Hours that you work will follow the football calendar, including weekends.

What languages are needed for it?

A range – we have recruited for roles requiring French, German, Italian, Spanish and Japanese.

What’s the typical pay?

Normally around £24,000 a year.

What skills and qualifications will you need?

You’ll need fluency in a specified language, e.g. German if you’re going to be working on the German league. Some research experience would be beneficial but mainly you’ll need an excellent knowledge of football in whatever country you’ll be working on. You’ll be asked a series of questions on the football leagues of that country and must get the majority right to be considered for an interview.

Why is it a great job?

For football fans, this is the opportunity to do a professional job doing something you follow and absolutely love. Not many people realise that is possible! Many companies also offer great benefits which can range from free healthcare to free food.

How can I apply?

If you think a football researcher role is for you, keep an eye on our website for the latest vacancies, or send your CV to m.eddleston@eurolondon.com so we have your details on file. Most importantly, make sure you know your football and get some research experience if possible. Good luck!

Anything we’ve missed? Let us know below and we’ll answer any questions you may have.

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You don't have to be a teacher!

At Euro London, every day we’re recruiting for a wide range of jobs involving languages. Yet we’re often surprised at the fact that many people don’t really know what opportunities are out there. Time and time again, we hear that people think their only option is to become a translator or teacher. We have run workshops with school students who didn’t realise what great jobs they could do if they continued to study languages and this proved to be one of the most popular discussion points among graduates at the Language Show, which we recently attended. Plus in our recent poll you told us what you wanted to hear about most was what jobs you could do with languages.

If there was more awareness about what exciting jobs multilingual people can do, in which you can really make a difference and more importantly earn good money, would it encourage more young people to learn languages? Well, we hope so, which is why we’re starting a series of blogs profiling some of the interesting jobs we’ve recruited for. If there are any you have in mind and would like more information on, just leave a comment below and we’ll do our best to cover it!

Look out for the “so you want to be a…” posts coming soon. We’ll also be posting links to the blogs on Twitter and Facebook to ensure you don’t miss a thing.

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